THE STORY

The original Gaelic was Am Bràigh Riabhach - literally 'the brindled (grizzled) upland'. Many locals still call the mountain The Braeriach. In the midst of the plateau lies the true source of the River Dee, the highest spring in Britain (at 3,900ft / 1,190m) - a trickle that spills over Braeriach's cliffs into the An Garbh Choire. It is this, 'the rough corrie', and the mountain's other corries, that distinguish Braeriach. Coire Brochain literally means 'porridge corrie' (for the broken boulders on its floor). An Garbh Choire can have an enormous influence on the wind - the summit can be still but you will hear a great roar just a few feet away, where the wind is accelerated up the cliff walls and forming dancing cloud in front of your eyes - careful not to get a shower from the waterfall heading up!

One of the earliest rock climbs recorded in Scotland took place on these cliffs: in 1810 the Rev. George Skene traced the River Dee to its source.


THE DETAILS

Mountain name, how to say it, what it means   |   its height   |   Mountain region; closest town(s) [may be some distance away tho!]   |   the view-points

background image © Google Earth

THE VIEW-POINTS

  1. Sgòr Gaoith: a view over the top of Loch Eanaich to even more corries of this massive mountain
  2. Ben MacDui: with a view straight into the heart of An Garbh-Choire and Sròn na Lairige framing the right side of the hill
  3. Carn a' Mhaim: this hill's long, rounded ridge points up Lairig Ghru to see into Braeriach's huge corries
  4. Càirn Toul: looking across Lochan Uaine then the plummet to the deep chasm of An Garbh-Choire 
  5. Coylumbridge: the northern start point, trekking through the beautiful Rothiemurcus Forest, the hill dominating the sky line


THE LOCALE

Home to the infant River Dee, this huge plateau topples down into An Garbh-Choire; its waterfall can run in reverse when there is a breeze - the cliff faces accelerate the wind upward and take the water with it. The bulk of the hill dominates the horizon from Aviemore / Coylumbridge, the corries on the south face are just as impressive.

ALONG THE WAY:

Sugar Bowl car park  |  Rothiemurchus Forest |  Lairig Ghru  |  Chlamain Gap  |  Braeriach  |  An Garbh Choire  |  Loch Coire an Lochan  |  Loch an Eilein castle ruin

NEAREST BOTHY:

Corrour   |   these are howffs only:  Garbh Choire  |  Shelter Stone

USUALLY WALKED WITH:

m005 Angel's Peak   |   m004 Càirn Toul


PLANNING

These links lead to the variety of walks, weather and maps to aid in planning your adventure to portray this hill.

FURTHER INFORMATION FOR THIS MUNRO:

McNeish "The Munros" 1999 p.119  |  SMC Hillwalkers 2013 p.138  |  Walkhighlands "The Munros" 2019 p.385  |  Bothy Bible 2017 p.175 + p.201


Click the image to visit Walk Highlands profile